Friday, 6 July 2018

Bad Breath (also known as Halitosis)

Learn more about Bad Breath, which is also known as Halitosis.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Kingery & Kingery, DDS, PLLC
Dentists Clemmons NC  
Tel: (336) 766-0511
2554 Lewisville Clemmons Rd 
Clemmons, NC 27012

Wednesday, 27 June 2018

How to Fight Mouth Germs and Keep Your Smile Healthy

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Brenna Stone

Does the thought of mouth germs taking up residence on your teeth make you feel a little uncomfortable? It should! Masses of harmful microorganisms in the mouth can form plaque, the sticky substance that adheres to the teeth and gumline. Plaque can really harm your teeth and gums. When it isn't removed by regular brushing and flossing, it can lead to cavities and gum disease! Find out what you can do to reduce the amount of germs in your mouth.

Regular Toothbrushing
Toothbrushing is a powerful tool for fighting germs. At the minimum, brush twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste; once after breakfast and once before going to bed. There is no harm in brushing your teeth more frequently. You can brush after meals to cut down on plaque formation and to freshen your breath. Spend a full two minutes gently brushing all surfaces of your teeth and your tongue. Use a toothpaste like Colgate Total that is designed to keep your mouth clean and to fight germs.

Bacteria can flourish on your toothbrush as well. Change your toothbrush when it begins to look worn, according to American Dental Association. The American Dental Association recommends switching to a new brush about every three to four months. It is best to leave your bristles in the open air; a closed, moist environment can harbor more bacteria. Also, don't share brushes; it is possible to transfer mouth germs this way.

Don't Forget to Floss
Daily flossing is another important way to keep your mouth clean and healthy. Flossing can help to remove plaque from places that your toothbrush can't reach. Slide your floss in between the teeth. Also clean at the base of each tooth, removing plaque and food debris from underneath the gum line.

Your Diet and Mouth Germs
What you eat can also help to support a healthy smile. Eating lots of sugary and starchy foods will increase the amount of sugars that are available for bacteria in your mouth to thrive upon. Try cutting back on sweet treats and snacking on fresh fruits and veggies instead. When eating grains, be sure to choose whole grains.

Take good care of your teeth with daily brushing and flossing. Eat a balanced diet and see your dentist for regular check-ups. Your dentist can check for signs of cavities and gum disease, the dental hygienist can also clean your teeth, removing the plaque and tartar (hardened dental plaque) that is on your teeth. With excellent oral hygiene, mouth germs don't stand a chance!

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

Kingery & Kingery, DDS, PLLC
Dentists Clemmons NC  
Tel: (336) 766-0511
2554 Lewisville Clemmons Rd 
Clemmons, NC 27012

Wednesday, 20 June 2018

How to Brush Your Teeth Properly: A Quick Guide

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by AM Hopkins

Everyone knows that brushing their teeth plays a major role in their overall health, but they may not be aware of the correct way to brush their teeth. The American Dental Association recommends that you brush your teeth at least twice each day; here is a quick guide to ensure you know how to do it properly.

Purchase the right toothbrush. Before you even begin the process of brushing your teeth, it's important that you have the right toothbrush. The type of toothbrush you select depends on your specific needs. If you need a toothbrush mostly for removing plaque, a soft-bristled brush is best. On the other hand, if you are concerned about reaching hard-to-reach spaces, you should consider a toothbrush with a smaller head. in the Colgate Oral Care resources.

Take your time. You should spend at least two minutes brushing your teeth. This may seem like a long time - the average person usually falls short of this goal - but it is necessary ensure that your teeth are clean. If you're worried about reaching this goal, consider investing in a toothbrush that has an automatic timer or use a stopwatch.

Be thorough. Tilt your toothbrush to a 45 degree angle and ensure that you are cleaning both the outer and inner surfaces of your upper and lower teeth. It is equally important to clean the chewing surfaces of your teeth, as well.

Be gentle. When brushing your teeth, it's important to use short, precise strokes. This ensures that you don't cause any trauma to your mouth and that you reach the specific areas you are trying to target. You should brush the entire surface of the tooth in a gentle back and forth motion.

Don't forget your tongue. Brushing your tongue is an essential part of maintaining proper oral care. Many people often overlook this step, but it is important to both your overall oral hygiene and the freshness of your breath.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

Kingery & Kingery, DDS, PLLC
Dentists Clemmons NC  
Tel: (336) 766-0511
2554 Lewisville Clemmons Rd 
Clemmons, NC 27012

Tuesday, 19 June 2018

Dental Sealants for Children

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about the importance of dental sealants as a preventive dental treatment for your children!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Kingery & Kingery, DDS, PLLC
Dentists Clemmons NC  
Tel: (336) 766-0511
2554 Lewisville Clemmons Rd 
Clemmons, NC 27012

Wednesday, 13 June 2018

Family Guide to Oral Health

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com

By following the information in this guide, you and your family can have healthy teeth and gums to last a lifetime. As a parent, you can work with your children to help them understand why good oral care is important - and show them how to do it right!

Four Steps to a Bright Smile

  1. Brush at least twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste, especially after eating breakfast and before bedtime.
  2. Floss every day.
  3. Limit the number of times you eat snacks each day.
  4. Visit your dentist regularly.

It's easy to guide your family toward good oral health. All it takes is the right information and a little practice to keep them moving in the right direction!

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Infographics on how to brush
  • Infographcis on how to floss
  • A list of preventive dental care tips!

Kingery & Kingery, DDS, PLLC
Dentists Clemmons NC  
Tel: (336) 766-0511
2554 Lewisville Clemmons Rd 
Clemmons, NC 27012

Tuesday, 12 June 2018

Stress & Oral Health

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about Stress and your Oral Health!


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Kingery & Kingery, DDS, PLLC
Dentists Clemmons NC  
Tel: (336) 766-0511
2554 Lewisville Clemmons Rd 
Clemmons, NC 27012

Tuesday, 5 June 2018

Periodontal Screening

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about Periodontal Screening!



Kingery & Kingery, DDS, PLLC
Dentists Clemmons NC  
Tel: (336) 766-0511
2554 Lewisville Clemmons Rd 
Clemmons, NC 27012

Sunday, 27 May 2018

What 10 Common Mouth Issues Really Look Like (Part 3 of 3)

You know good dental habits can help prevent things like cavities and gingivitis, but you may not know what conditions like these really look like or how they can affect your mouth. Use this visual guide to learn more about some of the most common dental health issues, symptoms to watch for and the potential treatments that are available. Please note: This content is for informational purposes only. Only a dentist, physician or other qualified health care professional can make a diagnosis.

Darkened Tooth







There are two reasons your tooth may change color after trauma: It’s either trying to protect the nerve or it’s dying. If it’s protecting the nerve, your tooth may look a little darker than the ones next to it. If it changes colors like a bruise (from pink to gray), this means your tooth is most likely dead. You may need a root canal, usually followed by a crown. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the tooth. If it is a baby tooth, you may be able to leave it alone until it falls out.

Canker Sores








Canker sores are small white or gray sores with a red border that appear your lips, the back of your throat or under your tongue. Their exact cause is uncertain but some suggest that immune system problems, bacteria or viruses may be play a role. They are also more common in women.


Canker sores aren’t contagious and usually heal on their own after one or two weeks. Over-the-counter creams and mouthwashes may give you temporary relief. Until it heals, stay away from hot, spicy or acidic foods because these can irritate the sore.

Cancer








Each year, approximately 40,000 new cases of oral cancer and cancers of the throat, tonsils and back of the tongue are diagnosed. Tobacco use, alcohol abuse and HPV all increase your chance of developing these cancers. Men are twice more likely to get oral cancer than women. During regular checkups, your dentist will check your mouth for symptoms like red or white patches, sores that won’t heal and rough, crusty spots. If anything suspicious is found, your dentist will order more testing or refer you to a specialist. The image above is only one example of how oral cancer might appear.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Kingery & Kingery, DDS, PLLC
Dentists Clemmons NC  
Tel: (336) 766-0511
2554 Lewisville Clemmons Rd 
Clemmons, NC 27012

Sunday, 20 May 2018

What 10 Common Mouth Issues Really Look Like (Part 2 of 3)

You know good dental habits can help prevent things like cavities and gingivitis, but you may not know what conditions like these really look like or how they can affect your mouth. Use this visual guide to learn more about some of the most common dental health issues, symptoms to watch for and the potential treatments that are available. Please note: This content is for informational purposes only. Only a dentist, physician or other qualified health care professional can make a diagnosis.

Gingivitis








Gingivitis is the earliest stage of gum disease, an infection of the tissues around your teeth caused by plaque. If you have gingivitis, your gums may become red, swollen and bleed easily. You may also experience bad breath. Because gum disease is usually painless, you may not know you have it.


You are more likely to develop gum disease if you skip brushing and flossing, use tobacco, have crooked teeth that are hard to keep clean, are pregnant, have diabetes or take certain medications. When in its early stages, the disease is still reversible and your gums can be returned to good health with a professional cleaning from your dentist, along with daily brushing and flossing.

Periodontitis








Periodontitis is the more advanced form of gum disease, a major cause of tooth loss in adults. According to the CDC, nearly half of U.S. adults suffer from it. The disease can be reversed in early stages, but damage may be permanent the longer it goes untreated. Although you may not be aware of the gum disease in your mouth, abscesses can develop which usually painful. Symptoms include bleeding, swollen gums, persistent bad breath or bad taste, loose permanent teeth and a change in bite. Your teeth may appear to become longer as gums and bone recede. There are many treatments available, including deep cleanings known as scaling and root planing. Talk to your dentist to find out what’s best for you.

Thrush








Thrush is a yeast infection that looks like white film in your mouth. You’re more likely to get thrush if you have an illness that affects your immune system. This includes people with HIV/AIDS or cancer, as well as people using steroids to manage their asthma. People with untreated or uncontrolled diabetes are also susceptible because sugar in saliva encourages yeast to grow. Thrush is also common in people who wear dentures. If you have symptoms, see your dentist. After a scraping to confirm you have thrush, your dentist can prescribe medicine to clear it up.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Kingery & Kingery, DDS, PLLC
Dentists Clemmons NC  
Tel: (336) 766-0511
2554 Lewisville Clemmons Rd 
Clemmons, NC 27012